10 Questions with Author Bokerah Brumley

Today, author Bokerah Brumley answers the 10 Questions about her writing. Bokerah writes in a variety of genres, including steampunk and fantasy. Her shorter works have appeared in several anthologies.

Linda Covella: When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Bokerah Brumley: It’s the normal story, I suppose. I’ve always wanted to. As a girl, I wrote a poem, but I didn’t come up with my first story until I was twelve or thirteen. I wrote a novella in which the main character was an emu named Pixley. I called it Pixley Down Under. After that, I tried my hand at a romance or two, but I never learned all the things I didn’t know about writing until 2015. That’s when I figured out I could finish a story. It’s also when I figured out that I wasn’t that good and started to work at getting better.

LC: Good for you. As writers, we’re constantly working to improve, aren’t we?

What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

BB: I write every day, but deadlines really help me get work done. Word count seems to depend on whether or not my doom is impending. I write by beats. I like to pants things, but I need the structure to know the major points I have to hit, and then I let everything else come out however it comes out. Outlining kills the joy of discovery for me, and then I don’t finish the work. Also, I write part-time. I might go full-time once my kids are grown and out of the house, but that’s another ten years off. J

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

BB: Any time any of my stories takes a farm turn, I’m definitely drawing on my experience. Beyond that, I’m SUCH a science fiction and fantasy lover. I generally come up with tech and magic for every story I write. Well… all except the contemporary romance ones. I do have a few of those coming out later this year.

LC: Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

BB: I’m always infatuated with whatever character I’m discovering at that moment. I don’t really have a favorite yet. I’ve enjoyed telling all the stories, each for different reasons. I liked writing the main character in THREE because she was so different than others I’ve come across. I based her on Temple Grandin. I like some of my sassy heroines, too. Those are fun. They’ve got some of the best witty repartee.

LC: Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

BB: I’m sure that I do. Maybe the brave and adventuring side? No, I know. I mom everything.

That’s how that works. I mom my characters. I like to pass on my love of family. Seems like everybody in my stories winds up finding their place, their home, and their family. One way or another.

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

BB: Oh, gosh. I’m horrid at this question. I would say that, normally, I find a character in a setting that I want to write about and then I try to come up with an absurd plot to change their lives in the worst way possible before righting it all again. I guess that makes me character driven? It’s hard for me to tell. Diagnosing my own work is very much “can’t see the forest for the trees” to me. J

LC: Did you read much as a child?

BB: I read ALL. THE. TIME. I read everything I could get my hands on. I loved all types of books.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

BB: I think it’s important as a way to wind down and relax, as a way to challenge themselves to do better, and also a way to learn what’s selling in their market. Suffice it to say, I think it’s of the utmost importance.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

BB: Favorite authors… Well, it depends on the genre. In sweet, contemporary romance, I really like Victorine Lieske. In fantasy, I’m rather fond of Marc Secchia. In science fiction, I enjoy reading work by Nick Cole. I’m also starting to read Michael Anderle, and he’s something of a UF/SciFi.

LC: Anything new in the works?

BB: I have a paranormal romance trilogy, a cyberpunk trilogy, and a sweet, contemporary romance series all coming out next year. I’m busy, I guess. I also have a dragon story in Shards, a Noblebright Anthology that will be out on October 1, 2018. That’s edited by CJ Brightly.

LC: Bonus question 🙂 Do you have anything you’d like to add?

BB: Ummm…. Send me your mailing address in an email [found on her Facebook page], and I’ll send you a feather from Johnny Cash, my peacock. I have ten available. Also, if you follow me on Instagram, you can see pictures of my farm. J I’m @bokerah over there.

LC: Thanks so much, Bokerah. I enjoyed hearing about your writing. And, from your bio below, your life sounds fascinating. And…I’m heading over to Instagram to check out your farm!

You can connect with Bokerah at the following:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/bokerah/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/bokerah

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bokerah/

Website: http://www.bokerah.com

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Bokerah-Brumley/e/B0191ALXWI/

Author Bio:

Bokerah Brumley lives on ten permaculture acres, complete with sheep, goats, peacocks, turkeys, geese, guineas, ducks, chickens, five home-educated children, and one husband. She also moonlights as an acquisitions editor for The Crossover Alliance and production/marketing manager for an independent New York publisher.

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Book Feature and a Recipe!

Thank you, Kristy Tate and kristystories.blogspot.com for featuring my book The Castle Blues Quake today!

The post includes a recipe for delicious Fruit Clafouti. The main character in the book, Pepper, loves to cook, which she learned from her chef parents. This is one of her favorites!

Enjoy!

 

 

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10 Questions with Author Krysten Lindsay Hager

Let’s welcome author Krysten Lindsay Hager who writes novels for tweens and young adults. Krysten has won numerous awards for her writing, and her work has appeared in many publications including USA Today.

Linda Covella: Hi, Krysten. I’m so happy you could join us today!

When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Krysten Lindsay Hager: I enjoyed creating stories since I was a kid making up storylines for my dolls. I can remember writing little stories in first grade and I always knew I wanted to write.

LC: I love that!

What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

KLH: I’m not an outliner, but when working on a book in a series I do have a journal where I jot down ideas so I have an idea of where I’m going.

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

KLH: I find inspiration everywhere from the news, overheard conversations, movies, and my own experiences. Friends of mine from my school days like reading my books to go down memory lane!

LC: Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

KLH: I like Cecily from Can Dreams Come True because of her sense of humor. She was fun to write as she meets her favorite pop star and goes through all the emotions of being overwhelmed and trying hard not to fan girl over him

LC: Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

KLH: Emme, Landry, Cecily, Pilar, and Lila have bit of my sense of humor. And Emme, Landry and Cecily all have my overthinking ability!

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

KLH: My books are more character driven. When you read the Landry’s True Colors Series you’re really going on a journey with the character.

LC: Did you read much as a child?

KLH: I was a big reader and used to go to the library a lot. My parents were very into education, so books were something they have a love for.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

KLH: It’s crucial. You can’t write well if you’re not a reader.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

KLH: I like May Sarton, Erika Tamar, Judy Blume and I’ve recently been reading some of the newer Nancy Drew books for fun. I like any story that pulls me in and makes me forget about the outside world.

LC: I loved reading Nancy Drew when I was young. I’ll have to check out the new books.

Anything new in the works?

KLH: I’m working on the follow up book to Can Dreams Come True.

LC: We’ll look forward to that. Thanks again for sharing your writing with us!

Author Bio: Krysten Lindsay Hager writes about friendship, self-esteem, fitting in, frenemies, crushes, fame, first loves, and values. She is the author of True Colors, Best Friends…Forever?, Next Door to a Star,  Landry in Like, Competing with the Star, Dating the It Guy, and Can Dreams Come True. True Colors, won the Readers Favorite award for best preteen book and the Dayton Book Expo Bestseller Award for childen/teens. Competing with the Star is a Readers’ Favorite Book Award Finalist. Dating the It Guy has been nominated for a RONE award. ​Krysten’s work has been featured in USA Today, The Flint Journal, the Grand Haven Tribune, the Beavercreek Current, the Bellbrook Times, Springfield News-Sun, Grand Blanc View, Dayton Daily News and on Living Dayton.

You can connect with Krysten at:

Website: http://www.krystenlindsay.com/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/krystenlindsay/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KrystenLindsayHagerAuthor

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/krystenlindsay/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/KrystenLindsay

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClIQCsRcKc97-25oXvabZ8A

Amazon page: https://www.amazon.com/Krysten-Lindsay-Hager/e/B00L2JC9P2/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

 

 

 

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10 Questions: Interview with Author Denitta Ward

Today I welcome historical fiction author Denitta Ward to answer “10 Questions” about her writing. Denitta’s books have received rave reviews from Kirkus, Historical Novel Society, and others. She writes about “young women discovering their own resilience in times of transition.”

Linda Covella: Welcome to my blog, Denitta!

When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Denitta Ward: About when I turned 50 I became a writer — so it’s never too late to start! The idea came to me as I sat on the back porch with my mom one day and then the story line sprung to life as I was standing in a line at DisneyWorld with my teenagers. At lunch I grabbed a napkin and sketched out the plot arc and key events — and Somewhere Still was born!

As an attorney, my job had been writing – briefs and contracts and I have to commend the legal education for teaching precision of language and a commitment to veracity and truth, qualities you must have, I feel, to be a good writer.

LC: Truth and veracity are especially important with historical fiction!

What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

DW: I write long-hand in a journal because I needed to write between gymnastics drop-offs and boy scout pick-ups or while waiting in the line at school to get the kids. I work full-time, and usually more than full-time, so I write in the small, dark hours of the morning, too. In my day job, I’m Assistant Vice Chancellor at a public university and run their office of Contracts & Grants. Supporting the university’s research and creative works enterprise is a real privilege and definitely uses a different part of my brain. Writing helps me rejuvenate myself for another workweek.

And, as for plotting – nope. The first question my agent asked is, “Are you a pantser or a plotter?” I’m definitely a pantser rather than a plotter. I fearlessly grab the seat of my pants and go! I’m trying to be better about plotting out key points because I’ve found that the seat of my pants can lead me into plot holes or leads me into giving voice to a character who really doesn’t need to have her story told at that moment. But, I save those pieces of writing in a file called “For Later” because…who knows when I’ll find a story that calls out for that very piece.

Also, for each book, the title come first. I know – most people say the title comes last. But, not me. After the title, then the general plot and the characters emerge and take over. The characters are vivid and lively to me – it’s as if they were always there, somewhere, waiting to be brought into this dimension. Maybe that’s where the title “Somewhere Series” came from.

LC: I’m a panster, too. But titles are very difficult for me—you’re lucky they come easily to you.

Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

DW: I write historical fiction and non-fiction companion books so, for me, the inspiration comes from real historical events. I do days and days of research – reading newspapers and magazines of the era first, then researching all the details I can about the politics and culture. I take detailed notes that sometimes I never even look at again because I then set that all aside and begin the story.

In researching Somewhere Still, I learned that in 1921 there was an active women’s Consumer League in Kansas City and they really were out inspecting dairies to assure the city’s milk supply was clean and safe. I loved learning about the activists of that era and how they were changing their corner of the world. The hotel, department store, restaurant, parks, fountains – they were all real places you can go and see in Kansas City, which made my research a real joy. I took my daughter and mom to the city for a research trip and we got to see all of these lovely historic locations.

Once I do all that research, I can’t really let it go to waste so, for the first book, set in the Roaring ’20s, I wrote Prohibition Cocktails – a nonfiction companion to Somewhere Still. It has a brief history of Prohibition and 21 recipes of the most popular cocktails of the day with the origin story of each one. You can pair the books for a fun bookclub evening with a signature cocktail!

LC: That does sound fun.

Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

DW: I have two characters I adored – for totally different reasons. Mrs. Katherine Whitcomb is the social-climbing mother of the male protagonist. Oh, she is quite a handful and such an insecure, acerbic lush. I loved writing her because she felt like my 100% alter-ego, being raised politely and confidently Midwestern myself. The other character I adored is Mrs. Hayward Parker, who in Somewhere Still is the true heroine in the novel — and puts things into motion that one would never, ever predict. I valued her courage, kindness and vision.

LC: Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

DW: My main female characters are always a young woman coming of age – somewhere between 17 and her early 20s, and I’m so distanced from those years that I think I write aspirationally – what I hope I would have done or thought in their circumstance. I tend to be directive and in control, traits my characters just don’t seem to have – at least so far.

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

DW: I want to create relatable, complicated characters who will stay with you long after you turn the last page. I was thrilled when the Historical Novel Society saw that in Somewhere Still. In their review they said, “This is a deep and complex story with credible characters that pull at the heartstrings. Half way through, I began to wonder how it could end. Ward’s final pages did not disappoint.” Those words thrilled me. The people in my books just seem to real to me – they could walk in my front door tomorrow and I would instantly know them.

LC: What a great review.

Did you read much as a child?

DW: Reading was a huge part of my childhood. I grew up way out in the country and one of my first memories was of the county Bookmobile pulling up to our property line. That was a thrilling day and it led me to learning what a “chapter” was. When I bugged my mother for something, she would often say, “Yes, dear, as soon as I finish this chapter.” Well, you know that led to a detailed discussion of just what was this chapter thing that was standing between me and – say – ice cream.

Once I could read chapter books, I devoured The House at Pooh Corner, Little House on the Prairie, and my all time favorite – a little known book about the Pennsylvania Dutch called Willow Brook Farm by Katherine D. Christ. Long before the internet existed, I wrote to and paid a bookfinder out of New York City to find me a copy of that book. Unwrapping that package and holding that book again was magical. It sits in my writing room to this day. I absolutely cherish it.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

DW: I read everything. Always. My nightstand may tip over one day from the stack of books there. When I’m in the novel-writing phase, though, I put all fiction aside. I don’t want to ever have my work be derivative of someone else’s. For me, that’s when I know a serious writing spell is upon me – I stop reading. I imagine, if I graphed it out, you would see my book reading decline and then see my chocolate-eating skyrocket. Everyone needs at least one vice.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

DW: Besides the children’s books I mentioned, I am a huge fan of everything by Elizabeth Berg. She is my all time favorite author. I had the privilege of sitting next to her on an airline flight and I DID NOT REALIZE IT. This statuesque blonde woman, at the very end of the flight as the seat belt light turned off, asked me, “What do you think of that book?” I was reading “We Are All Welcome Here” set in Tupelo, Mississippi and I gushed, “It’s wonderful. I read every book Elizabeth Berg writes. She’s my favorite author and she puts out about a book a year. You should read them.” And the woman blushed eight shades of red and just said, “Oh,” as she stood up to retrieve a brand new Brighton shopping bag she’d stowed overhead. Only that evening when I turned to the back of the book did I see her picture and I almost fell out of bed. Of course, at the airport we just went out different ways and I always wondered what she thought about her biggest fan in the world gushing over her, without having the sense to know it was her! And I would have asked her to sign my book, you know! Can you tell I am really bad at facial recognition?

LC: That’s quite a story. So cool that you got to “meet” her. 🙂

Anything new in the works?

DW: Somewhere Else is written and in edits right now – it’s the story of a young Cuban woman who comes to Havana in the weeks before the revolution. Here’s a sneak peek of Somewhere Else:

When innocent and naive becomes courageous and strong…

Escaping the brutality of Revolutionary forces and finding refuge in Havana is Isabella Rodriguez’s only hope for survival. Sent by her village priest to serve as a governess for the elite Romero family’s three innocent children, Izzie finds a perfect sanctuary.

But when Izzie is cast out in a hasty and jealous rage by the very woman she came to serve, she finds herself alone and desperate. As Castro’s forces approach, the threat of danger intensifies.

Encountering a seductive American, Thomas Whitcomb, just might be the salvation Izzie craves. But Thomas’ own secrets threaten to destroy everything.

With the revolution escalating and Thomas disappearing, Izzie seeks refuge in her faith and learns that nothing is as it seems. She must do all that she can to survive and save the innocent Romero children from a devastating fate. In a world of danger and mistrust, can Izzie find safety, love, and happiness anywhere?

LC: Bonus question 🙂 Do you have anything you’d like to add?

DW: I would be delighted to hear from readers! Please come find me on social media and let me know what you think about Somewhere Still. My website is http://www.denitta.com where you can sign up for my newsletter. On Instagram I post lots of pictures of my garden flowers and my sweet Belgian Tervuren and on Pinterest you’ll find pages dedicated to sites that inspire each book. And, thank you so much for hosting me here today!

LC: I enjoyed having you!

Other places to connect with Denitta:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DenittaWrites/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/denittaward

Instagram: https://instagram.com/denittaward

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ddward0596/

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10 Questions with Author Jane B. Night

Jane B. Night has a busy life working a full-time job and raising twin daughters. And she finds time to write with several published novels as well as some non-fiction titles. Here, Jane steps up and answers my “10 Questions” about her writing.

Linda Covella: Jane, welcome! I’m so glad to have you on my blog. When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Jane Night:I was in second grade. I won the young authors award and was able to go to this all day program for students. I met a children’s book writer and just felt totally inspired. I knew then that I wanted to write.

LC: Wow, that’s quite an accomplishment for a second grader!

What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

JN: I try to write five days a week but that doesn’t always happen. I am a ghostwriter as well as a novelist so paying clients come before my own work. I consider myself a mapper. Kinda a hybrid between pantser and plotter. I have a very basic outline but lots of room to make choices as I go.

I don’t currently have an office so I write wherever I can. On the living room couch, at my kids activities, and in bed on my laptop.

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

JN: I draw a lot from other books as well as from my own experiences. Many of my characters have children or a strong desire to be a mother. I spent years trying to conceive and after undergoing fertility treatments finally have twin daughters.

You will also notice a twin theme in my books. I think three of them explore twin relationships.

Also, I have a lot of characters who aren’t traditionally pretty. I am overweight and have been since childhood. It effected lots of my relationships. I like writing characters who find love despite not being traditionally attractive. I have two amputee characters as well as a burn victim. In one of my future books I have a character with a lazy eye. All find lasting love.

LC: That’s great. We need more books that represent all types of people, not just the ones that society considers “beautiful.”

Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

JN: This is really hard. I love so many of my characters. All have a little piece of me. I guess my favorite characters are probably from my first two books. I spent years with them as I learned how to write. Birdy, from Singing the Last Song, is sassy and independent. Autumn, from Educating Autumn, is curious and able to change her world views based on new information.

LC: Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

JN: I think so. I have lots of characters who love reading. I am a huge bookworm.

I also have several characters who work in healthcare. That is my day job. I am in healthcare because I love people and all my medical professionals have huge hearts. They didn’t get into healthcare for the glamour or status. They all want to care for the sick.

LC: Very inspiring professions!

Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

JN: Very character driven. I mostly write romance and in that genre character is most important. My most recent book, The Alpha’s Niece, is about a woman healing from a trauma. At the start of the book she has severe anxiety attacks but when the stakes are high she stands and fights.

LC: Did you read much as a child?

JN: All the time. I was a total bookworm.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

JN: I think it is very important. Reading teaches you how to tell stories.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

JN: Wow, such a hard question. It changes all the time.

I love James Herriot because he writes about animals and his experiences as a veterinarian.

I love Mary Balogh because she writes lots of beta males and I prefer them to alphas. In fact, most of my heroes are beta males.

I love Virginia Henley and Victoria Thompson because of their incorporation of history into stories.

I love Laura Levine for her humor.

LC: Anything new in the works?

JN: I am currently working on the rest of the Barton series.

Book 1 was the Alpha’s Niece. Book 2 is She-Wolf wanted. It is about a man who becomes the guardian of four children after his brother dies. He is a busy lawyer and doesn’t have time to be Mr. Mom so he places an advertisement in the newspaper for a wife. While he is interviewing and courting the ladies who answered the ad he falls in love with Catherine, the children’s aunt who has been caring for them while he sought out a wife.

 

LC: Bonus question 🙂 Do you have anything you’d like to add?

JN: Being a writer is amazing. It is truly living the dream. Most days anyways.

LC: Jane, thanks so much for taking the time and sharing your writing life.

Readers, you can connect with Jane at:

Her website: http://www.authorjanebnight.webs.com

Amazon Author’s page: https://www.amazon.com/author/janebnight

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JaneBNight

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7012589.Jane_B_Night

 

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#MCRPop: The Little Bookstore That Could

This is such a cool and clever idea from Nathalie Mvondo and her blog, Multiculturalism Rocks! Please enjoy reading her blog post about her pop-up bookstore focusing on multicultural and bilingual children’s books.

Multiculturalism Rocks!

Humble beginnings. 💚

I didn’t have much money. What I had was the burning desire to fill a big void in my community: the need for multicultural children’s books, including bilingual books. The desire to put the books I love into the hands of the readers looking for them. The desire to support diversity-focused small presses and independent authors of excellent books, but whom I know to have no or little marketing budget. These books are not yet reviewed by big, well-known newspapers, and not carried by big chain bookstores.

I figured I’d start with 10 copies of 10 different titles, and replace sold-out titles by new ones, to keep the customers looking for new items. As you will read below, reality quickly outgrew my vision.

I sold some personal items and emptied my saving account to purchase a business license, a seller’s permit, and to place the required ad…

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10 Questions with Arthur Daigle

Today I welcome Arthur Daigle to my blog. With his degree in biology, he’s had an interesting career working at such places as a zoo, a wildlife foundation, and an arboretum. But his love of fantasy and science fiction, along with his sense of humor, led him to publishing six books, with more on the way!

Linda Covella: Arthur, I’m so glad you could join us today! When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Arthur Daigle: It wasn’t really a conscious decision. I started writing as a hobby back in senior year high school and then college. After graduating I had free time and began writing books. It wasn’t until much later that relatives and friends encouraged me to try to publish them.

LC: What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

AD: I mostly write on my computer on my bed, no office or special place needed. I am most definitely a part time writer, as my books don’t generate enough money to cover my bills. This means for now my day job is essential (grumble) and writing is done in my free time.

I outline my books in a manner of speaking. I take long walks for relaxation and exercise. When I do this, I picture scenes of my books in my head. They’re like short movie clips running anywhere from ten seconds to a few minutes. Once I have enough of these mental clips together I sit down and start writing. I do come up with new bits while I write, but 90% or so is plotted out before I begin writing.

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

AD: My primary interests come from the works of the filmmaker and puppeteer Jim Henson and the British artist Brian Froud. Other sources of ideas have included dreams, history books, TV shows, movies, video games, and more. Some ideas seem to just pop up without any obvious source.

LC: Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

AD: One of my characters is Vial the goblin alchemist. On his youth he saw a wizard casting spells and was so impressed that he begged many wizards to take him on as an apprentice. The all refused since goblins were notoriously crazy, stupid and troublesome. Vial stole books on alchemy as a close approximation to his dream job and set to work building ever larger and more complex bombs. Vial is calm, intelligent, and has a fascination with explosives that borders on pathological.

I like him because many of the other goblins in my books and both trolls need Will Bradshaw to guide them. Vial is happy to follow orders, but he is less dependent on Will. If Vial was alone and leaderless, he’d go his own way. He is also an example of how people can grow beyond what others expect of them. Goblins are supposed to be stupid, yet Vial can read, follow complex plans and build the tools he needs for his work.

LC: Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

AD: People who know me say that I put a lot of myself into my main character, William Bradshaw.

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

AD: My books tend toward plot driven. I want major events that could change the world taking place. This creates a lot of excitement and gives the heroes a good reason to get involved, even if it’s only for their own survival.

LC: Did you read much as a child?

Constantly. I spent a lot of time reading in my school’s library and bought books at book fairs. My father also had a lot of books at home to read. Many of them were about biology, gardening, wildlife and the like, which appealed to me.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

AD: I feel if you’re going to be a good writer than you need to read ten pages for every page your write. And you need to read outside your genre. Books on botany, biology, geology and history help you create a believable world, and that is essential even for fantasy novels. Biographies and history books also have a wealth of story ideas so bizarre that you’d swear they were made up if they weren’t real.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

AD: I enjoy the Honor Harrington books by David Weber. His science fiction books tend to info dump, but given how large the world is and how advanced readers need to get the details. I also like Terry Pratchett’s Disc World books. Terry wrote great fantasy and very funny books. He did have a tendency towards elitism, where common people were so stupid and greedy that they needed tyrants, kings and witches to rule them, but otherwise his work is so exceptional that I can overlook that flaw.

LC: Anything new in the works?

AD: Lots. I have another book for William Bradshaw in rough draft stage and another coming up. I also have short stories in the Fellowship of Fantasy series available on Amazon.

LC: We’ll look forward to seeing those works. Thanks again for talking with us today!

Author Bio:

Arthur Daigle was born and raised in the suburbs of Chicago, Illinois. He received a degree in biology from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, which sounded like a good idea at the time. This led to work as a zoo intern at Brookfield Zoo, an assistant fisheries biologist at the Max McGraw Wildlife Foundation, and a research assistant at Morton Arboretum. Most recently he’s been employed grading high school essay tests and garden associate (yeah, the job market is that bad). In addition to writing, Arthur is an avid gardener and amateur artist.
Arthur is the author (no jokes, please, he’s heard them all) of six books. These include William Bradshaw King of the Goblins, William Bradshaw and a Faint Hope, William Bradshaw and War Unending, William Bradshaw and Fool’s Gold, Goblin Stories and Dr. Moratrayas Mad Scientist. These books were almost inevitable given that the author has been a fan of science fiction and fantasy since he was old enough to walk. Major influences include the works of the puppeteer and filmmaker Jim Henson and the British artist Brian Froud. Expect more books in the Will Bradshaw series, as all attempts to stop Arthur from writing have failed.

You can contact Arthur at the following links:

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/default/e/B00JACHZNY/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/arthur.daigle.52

Booksie: https://www.booksie.com/portfolio-view/ArthurD7000-131311

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arthur-daigle-26674274/

 

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10 Questions: Interview with Author Keith Guernsey

Today nonfiction author Keith Guernsey discusses his books that delve into his personal struggles and subsequent triumphs with his health, the importance of family, and…sports!

Linda Covella: Welcome, Keith. I’m really happy to have you here today to share your stories.

When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Keith Guernsey: I never actually planned on being a writer. 25 years ago I just started jotting down memories of games (primarily football, hockey and baseball) played, coached and attended.

LC: What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

KG: I write early in the morning (around seven a.m. after my five o’clock workout). I try to be consistent and write a minimum of three sentences /day. I write non-fiction so I plot as I go.

LC: What made you decide to write nonfiction, and about your own experiences?

KG: To leave a legacy for my grandson so that he would know that you can overcome adversity.

LC: Please tell us a little about your published books.

KG: “Fathers & Sons…” is a story of an uncommon love and devotion between fathers and sons.

It is a story of my recovery from two rounds of life-threatening brain surgeries to play on three championship softball teams in two states.
It is also an ode to my late, great father Gordon who was always the best sports parent ever!

It includes a chapter on the most controversial sports topic of our time; Deflategate. “Fathers…” is also a sequel to “Confessions of a Beantown Sports Junkie.”

LC: You truly have overcome adversity. And it sounds like you had a wonderful relationship with your father. What did your son think of Fathers and Sons?

KG: He enjoyed it and is re-reading it as I write this!

LC: Did you read much as a child?

KG: No, just what was assigned in school!

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

KG: I now think it is very important. I read Patterson/Baldacci/Grisham and get a lot of good ideas from them.

LC: Anything new in the works?

KG: Yes, I’m writing my third book about my recovery from two rounds of life-threatening brain surgeries and my recent cancer diagnosis.

LC: You have amazing strength of character and perseverance; such an inspiration.

Do you have anything you’d like to add?

KG: I would just like to thank you for this wonderful opportunity!

LC: You’re very welcome, Keith. Thank you so much for joining us today. I wish you all the best for your health and your writing!

Readers, you can connect with Keith at the following:

Amazon author page: https://www.amazon.com/default/e/B00PR51Q7Y/

Email: thegurns2005@yahoo.com

Twitter: @thegurns

Author Bio:

Mr. Keith D. Guernsey is retired after a forty year career in sales and sales management with several fortune 500 companies. He currently lives on Lake Lanier with his wife Susan and four-footed son Harley.

Mr. Guernsey spent a good portion of his youth playing sports, active in both football and hockey. In 1995 Keith was diagnosed with a life-threatening brain tumor (called an Acoustic Neuroma) and he underwent a ten hour operation at the world-renowned Brigham and Women’s hospital where it was successfully removed. While recovering, he met and married Susan. Together they faced his next challenge. In 1997 his neuroma returned. He was to undergo yet another, more complex, operation which resulted in a complete cure; however side effects of this second more invasive procedure caused prolonged inactivity and led to severe weight gain of over 100 lbs. Today Mr. Guernsey is very proud of the fact that he has been able to overcome his physical challenges, losing over one hundred and thirty five pounds, and has found the time to write two successful books: Confessions of a Beantown Sports Junkie and Fathers and Sons-Sports and Life.

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10 Questions: Author Anne Perreault

Answering today’s “10 Questions” is author Anne Perreault. Anne has lived an exciting life, traveling and living in a variety places around the world since she was a young teen. This and her interesting careers are reflected in her writing.

Linda Covella: Welcome Anne! When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Anne Perreault: I never thought I’d be a writer. I always had stories floating around in my head and I loved to read, but the writing part always caused me issues. I had given up on that years ago. It wasn’t until I homeschooled my daughter, I found the books for her age group lacking. So I decided to write a story for her. That started it all. It took 12 years to finish and when I was done, I just couldn’t stop writing.

LC: Wow, that is some impressive perseverance!

What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

AP: I’m very thankful to be home full time. I teach my youngest, who is in high school now. It still leaves me a lot of time to write. I don’t have a set time. If I feel like it, I write. I don’t outline plots in any detail. The story comes to me in full and I just jot down notes to remind myself, such as character descriptions and such, and basic outline. I find that as I’m writing, the story changes and becomes something totally different than I had thought it was.

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

AP: I do draw from my own experiences but not all. Sometimes a story idea just pops into my head and I ask myself how in the world it got there. For example, I wrote about human trafficking, something I had to do a lot of research for. I also like to incorporate my travel experience into some of the stories. I’ve been all over the world and I love plopping my characters into exotic backgrounds. I’ve lived in Dubai, which has come up in my series The Royal Skater Chronicles. My experience in Pakistan appears in my next novel, due out next month.

LC: You’re lucky to have traveled so much. And I love stories that take place in different countries. As a reader, I learn a lot about and appreciate cultures different from my own.

Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

AP: I like all my characters, but my favorite would have to be Jacqueline, a young skater. Her story started it all. It has been with me in some form for nearly 30 years and so I’m partial to her. But my quirkiest character would be the mechanic Tiffany from my story, Running the Good Race. She just made me laugh a lot.

LC: And I see from your Amazon bio that you love to skate! Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

AP: I suppose it’s only natural to do so. I try not to but I guess my humor comes through.

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

AP: I would say they are character driven. Each character has to go through a lot of development and comes to a place I feel I can safely leave them to their own devices. For example, the story about my skater, Jacqueline, is definitely character development. She grows up right in front of our eyes and tackles the challenges life presents.

LC: Did you read much as a child?

AP: Uh… yes. When I wasn’t reading, I was making up stories.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

AP: I really can’t say. I didn’t start writing until later in life.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

AP: I love and write Christian Fiction. I love the way the characters need to tackle the challenges. What draws me to them is the development and the resolution.

LC: Anything new in the works?

AP: I have a new book coming out next month. It’s a story about a young woman who finds herself in a precarious situation as she travels in a foreign country. It’s called, What if…

LC: Thank you, Anne. It was a pleasure having you on my blog!

You can connect with Anne at:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/intothelightfiction/

Website: https://intothelightfiction.weebly.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnnePerreau5

Instagram: anne.perreault.92

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Anne-Perreault/e/B019M0QAO8/

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10 Questions: Author Rachel Rossano

Today I welcome author Rachel Rossano who lets us into her writing world by answering the “10 Questions.” Rachel is a prolific author who writes in a variety of genres. She says “she endeavors to enchant, thrill, entertain, and amuse through her work.”

Linda Covella: Welcome, Rachel! Let’s get down to business. 🙂  When and why did you decide to become a writer?

Rachel Rossano: I started writing as a teen because I didn’t like the way some of my favorite books ended. Since then I have fallen in love with the discovery and writing process. I love creating worlds and exploring them with characters.

LC: What is your writing process: where do you write, how often do you write, are you a full-time or part-time writer, do you outline or do you plot as you go, etc.?

RR: I write when and where I can. I am a homeschooling mother of three so writing time happens in the spaced between everything else. Making it a priority after the kids are in bed and when I do catch a slow-down in the schedule works. My three favorite locations are on the end of my couch, at my desk in the schoolroom, or out at a local restaurant where I can tune out the white noise of other diners.

The goal is to write every day, but it doesn’t always happen. I would say I am a part-time author, but the process happens all the time in my head. I am a hybrid between plotting and pantsing in my approach. The prep work for a new novel is extensive, but I don’t plot the whole book, only about halfway. Then I write until the point I reach the end of my outline. If I still have a clear idea and talkative characters, I frequently keep running with it, but if things aren’t as obvious to me, I pause to plot and figure out what needs to happen until the end of the book.

LC: Where do you find your inspiration for your stories? Do you draw from your own experiences?

RR: My own experiences, the testimony and stories of others, and a generous helping of research and brainstorming all help inspire stories. However, the inspiration is almost everywhere. I frequently get ideas when driving or waiting for something and mentally follow it through to see if it will work for a current or new project before writing it down.

LC: Writers are always “writing” even if only in our heads, right?

Who is one of your favorite characters from your story(ies), one that you enjoyed creating and writing about, and why?

RR: The hero and heroine of my current WIP is usually my favorite at one time or another. Then, if I happen to spend time with an old project or even just discuss it with someone, the characters come to the forefront and I remember exactly why I love them all over again. They are a bit like children one can’t really have a favorite.

However, if I had to choose one, I would have to pick Lord Dentin. He is my hero in Honor (Second Novel of Rhynan), but he has played and promises to play a far reaching role in the series. As a recurring character in the series, he has become like an old friend I keep running into with each new story. I love him more each moment I spend with him.

Jerome Simon Cordale, Earl of Dentin isn’t an easy man to get to know. He doesn’t talk much, doesn’t appear to have anything to prove to anyone, and tends to meddle in other people’s affairs in a benevolent way. He first shows up as Tomas’ eccentric and powerful friend in Duty (First Novel of Rhynan). Just his appearance and role in the second half of the book was enough to get readers asking for more of him. So, I made him the hero of my next book in the series, Honor. In the process I fleshed out his background to the point that I ended up writing eight short stories and publishing an anthology around him. Since then, he has played a major role in the next novel of the series, Mercy (written and still unpublished); gets a mention in the first book of my newest series (also written, but still unpublished); and has written himself into the plots of the remaining three planned novels of the Rhynan series. I am a bit infatuated with him as a character.

LC: He sounds very determined that you keep him in your writing world!

Do you incorporate (or inadvertently find) any of your own personality traits into your characters?

RR: Many of my characters have personality traits that I share (or admire in others), but none of them are me. I have a lot of readers among my characters because I love to read. But I am definitely not a warrior and many of my characters are. Also, some of my characters are very different from me because I want to explore that kind of personality from the inside out and know it well.

LC: Do you find your stories are more plot driven or character driven? Please explain.

RR: All of my stories have both, solid plot and dynamic characters. I do tend toward character-driven plots because they are more organic feeling to me, but both are necessary for a good book.

LC: Did you read much as a child?

RR: Constantly! I systematically read my way through large portions of the library as a kid, all the way up to young adulthood. Now that I have kids, we are constantly lurking around our local library. Our house is filled with books on almost any topic and they are all well read by many of us. I had to fight to restrict the bookshelves in our family room to only one because very other room in the house (except bathrooms) are completely filled with bookcases.

LC: How important do you think reading is for writers?

RR: Vital! Good writing inspires and teaches good writing. Learning the thoughts and word patterns of those who have gone before informs us, inspires us, and warns us about the good and bad ways to write.

LC: Who are some of your favorite authors and/or books? What draws you to them?

RR:Diana Wynne Jones always inspires me, challenges me, and entertains me at once. If I need to be refreshed and inspired as a writer, I read her. Patricia C. Wrede challenges my world building skills. Orson Scott Card’s characterization skill is something I strive for in my own work. Robin McKinley’s ability to tell a good story always drags me into her work. If I want a bit of romance, I pick up a Sarah M. Eden book. C. S. Lewis’ skill with words and expressing complex ideas and thoughts makes me want to spend hours unpacking his sentences and paragraphs. Jane Austen’s ability to make the trivial profound and life altering enthralls me. I admit it. I am a word addict.

LC: Anything new in the works?

RR: I am currently developing a new series set in a different region of the same world as my Rhynan Novels and Theodoric Saga series. This one will be loosely inspired by fairytales. The stories will be retold with a few of the elements, but no magic. Not because I am against it, but because the world’s already established rules don’t include magic.

Just a few weeks ago, I finished the first draft of the first novel in a new series: Grace by Contract (a Beauty and the Beast retelling). My beast is a scared ruler of a small independent mini-nation. He can be a bit brusque, but he is a good man at heart. His lady isn’t a woman of means or title, but the eldest daughter of a not so moral merchant who has fallen on hard times.

On my publishing plate, I am working my way through my already written novels that just need polishing to get out into the world. The second and third novels in The Talented set (The Defender, Living Sacrifice), the third novel in the Novels of Rhynan series (Mercy), a first novel in a science fiction series (Diaspora), and a stand-alone novel (White Bear) are all moving forward.

My writing desk is very full of potential novels in the plotting and planning phases. The next novel in my Rhynan series features a certain mysterious stranger who appears in Mercy. A slew of novels inspired by fairtales (Month Brothers, an East of the Sun West of the Moon/Rapunzel mashup, Wild Swans, a goose girl, and some dancing princesses) need attention. Also, my space pirate brother of the hero of Diaspora is eager to tell his story. Oh, and there is that little post WWII story that won’t leave me alone but needs a ton of research before I write it.

LC: That’s a lot for readers to look forward to!

Do you have anything you’d like to add?

RR: Thank you so much for hosting me and letting me chat about my favorite topics, writing and reading.

LC: It was my pleasure!

Readers, you can connect with Rachel at the following:

Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/RachelRossanoRambles

Twitter – https://twitter.com/RachelRossano

Pinterest – http://www.pinterest.com/rachelrossano/

Goodreads – http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1430209.Rachel_Rossano

Blog – http://www.rachelrossano.com/

Amazon Author Page – http://www.amazon.com/Rachel-Rossano/e/B004MV17GE/

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/anavrea

Newsletter Sign Up – http://eepurl.com/4sbsv

Rachel Rossano Bio:

Rachel Rossano loves words. Since childhood she has been fascinated how they can be combined into stories of various kinds. After of years of reading everything she could get her hands on, she decided to try a bit of storytelling herself. She lives with her wonderfully supportive husband and their three talkative kids in a boisterous and laughter-filled house. Between homeschooling, keeping the chaos at bay, and grabbing moments to write, her life is delightfully full.

 

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